Rescued Film Project – Rescued WWII

Here is a fairly large gallery of images from found film, taken during WWII. They were developed by The Rescued Film Project. Now, normally when you see these galleries, they are images of things happening in Europe, where the fighting was taking place; pictures of destroyed street corners, blown-up equipment, etc. These, however, show what was taking place on the homefront, a perspective that can go unnoticed. That is why these images are interesting to me.

The Rescued Film Project – rescuedWWII

25 Vintage Police Record Photographs «TwistedSifter

So today I came across the website Twisted Sifter, an Australian image blog that has some great finds. This is one of them – police photos from the 20’s, 30’s and 40’s around Sydney and New South Wales.

Warning – graphic images.

25 Vintage Police Record Photographs «TwistedSifter.

Abandoned Coal Mine / Processing Facility

I’m currently in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, a very scenic place. There is lots to look at here – the countryside is very beautiful, the mountains are gorgeous, and there are plenty of parks with hiking trails, waterfalls, beautiful forests, etc.

So one thing I didn’t expect to find here was an abandoned coal mine. It’s probably the biggest abandoned building I’ve ever been inside, not to mention the most dangerous. A couple of buddies from work went there with me – in a couple of shots, you can see Doug setting up for shots of his own. I used my brand new Sunpak tripod. The thing is awesome – it was just under fifty bucks at Best Buy, it has a pistol grip head that has a complete range of movement in a sphere, and it has retractable spikes on the feet for use in outdoor environments. I love the thing.

So back to the creepy old mine (sounds like an episode of Scooby-Doo eh?), we stumbled and burrowed our way around for the better part of three hours. There was lots to see – old equipment, boilers, electrical boxes, some sort of generator / turbine assembly, and a set of four absolutely huge furnaces. Lots of light play was going on, many opportunities for framing shots through windows, and in general it was an incredible all around experience.

If you ever find yourself in Wilkes-Barre, head south from town on highway 309 and wind your way through the village to see this incredible piece of history.


Construction of the Golden Gate Bridge

Construction of the Golden Gate BridgeThe always outstanding has some fantastic images that were taken during the construction of the Golden Gate Bridge, in the years leading up to 1937. The bridge got it’s name from the Golden Gate  – the body of water that connects the San Francisco Bay to the Pacific Ocean –  and is one of the worlds most photographed bridges. See here some of the very first of those photographs. – Golden Gate Bridge

Itinerant Photography

Itinerant Photography

An interesting phenomenon that I’d never heard of before. Back in the 30’s, itinerant photographers would photograph many aspects of a town and it’s residents, then try to sell prints to said residents.

Here is a fairly large gallery of photo’s from this time period, hosted by the University of Texas’ Harry Ransom Center. It’s a fantastic look at how life was in the early part of the 1900’s. These photo’s are from the Corpus Christi area circa 1930-1940.

Itinerant Photography